OUTLINE OF OOMOTO 1 of aizenkai



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OUTLINE OF OOMOTO 1

1. THE FOUNDERESS’S CAREER

The origin of Oomoto dates back to according to the old calendar from New Years Day 1892, when Nao Deguchi “Foundress of Oomoto” became aware of her mediumistic powers. Oomoto now has a history of more than 100 years. This 100 plus years course of the Oomoto religion has a unique signification in the religious annals of modern Japan.
Nao Deguchi from the Oomoto religion was born December 16th 1836 as the eldest daughter of Goroburo Kirimura of Fukuchiyama in Tamba province Japan.
Kirimura, her father was a carpenter by trade; but the family was so poor that from her infancy she had a very hard life. She was a nursemaid for a time and then later became a servant to help support her family.
Her filial devotion was officially commended when she was 12 years old by the lord of the clan as one of the three dutiful girls in the domain. At 16, she left domestic service so as to help her mother at home. When she was 17, in 1853, the Deguchi family adopted her as a daughter where her aunt in the maternal line became her stepmother.
Later, she became the wife of Masagoro Deguchi, a carpenter. She was diligent to feed her eight children.
Some time later, Masagoro was hurt while working, which caused paralysis. He was confined to bed for approximately 2 years. She nursed him with great self-sacrifice and devotion. At the same time she toiled away so piteously that she became excited with all the sympathy all around her. Gorosaburo went on his last journey in 1887 at the age of 60. All the care his wife had taken proved to be of no avail.
She was 51 years old. She had to struggle for her daily bread having a large family of eight children to support with scanty means.
The environment that surrounded her at that time was backward, gloomy, and pre-modern and the capitalistic system in Japan was only in the premature stage. Misfortune fell upon her in rapid succession.
She was however; perfectly calm and passive in such adversity, no contention with providence nor reproaching others, but devoting herself to her religious devotion with a plain alter in her shabby house.